Lithium Battery Comparison.

Diode

Cartaholic - V.I.P. Sponsor
Have you run any of these with an AC system what size would you need for a four or six hundred amp AC system
 

Cart_Performance

New Member
Yes we have ran 48, and 72 volt set ups on navitias ac systems. You will need 4 batteries at the ac system needs 48 volts to work. Amp hr is the range of drive time.
 

Alex D

New Member
Yes we have ran 48, and 72 volt set ups on navitias ac systems. You will need 4 batteries at the ac system needs 48 volts to work. Amp hr is the range of drive time.
The Navitas 600 amp AC conversion kit controller in my TXT accepts anywhere from 48 to 72V input voltage. That is clear in the manual. I would always go with the 72V if only for best top speed. Just make sure the solenoid is a 72V as well. I have the SW200 which can also be had in 72V. I plan to switch when my LA batteries need replacement.
 

Pat911

Cartaholic
Yes we have ran 48, and 72 volt set ups on navitias ac systems. You will need 4 batteries at the ac system needs 48 volts to work. Amp hr is the range of drive time.

Hi Cart_Performance,

You’re not really recommending series connected 12v lithium batteries are you? The video shows the correct way, a 48v (or 72v) complete pack but your answer above contradicts this. Series connected lithium batteries being managed by multiple BMS’s is definitely not good practice.

Also, yes, Amp Hour rate is the run time but in conjunction with the cells discharge C rate, both continuous and peak, it governs the maximum current that a pack can supply. There is also a duration for the peak current. As an example, a typical 100Ah pack with a properly matched BMS may have a continuous discharge of 1C (100A) with a peak of 3C (300A) for 30 seconds. As you can see, this typical pack wouldn’t be able to run a 400A or 600A AC (or DC for that matter) system at full power that I believe Diode was referring to above. You will need AT LEAST two such batteries in parallel to do so. 1C continuous and 3C peak at 30 seconds is pretty typical for LiFePO4 cells.

Cheers
Pat.
 

Alex D

New Member
Hi Cart_Performance,

You’re not really recommending series connected 12v lithium batteries are you? The video shows the correct way, a 48v (or 72v) complete pack but your answer above contradicts this. Series connected lithium batteries being managed by multiple BMS’s is definitely not good practice.

Also, yes, Amp Hour rate is the run time but in conjunction with the cells discharge C rate, both continuous and peak, it governs the maximum current that a pack can supply. There is also a duration for the peak current. As an example, a typical 100Ah pack with a properly matched BMS may have a continuous discharge of 1C (100A) with a peak of 3C (300A) for 30 seconds. As you can see, this typical pack wouldn’t be able to run a 400A or 600A AC (or DC for that matter) system at full power that I believe Diode was referring to above. You will need AT LEAST two such batteries in parallel to do so. 1C continuous and 3C peak at 30 seconds is pretty typical for LiFePO4 cells.

Cheers
Pat.
No I am not. I am not recommending anything. I commented that I personally will go for a complete 72V Lithium pack available from multiple manufacturers.
 

Pat911

Cartaholic
Hi Alex D,

My comment was directed to Cart_Performance, not you. Cart_Performance implied that as the AC system is 48v it would need 4 batteries. Without further clarification, to me this implies 4 series connected 12v batteries. You should never series connected Lithium “batteries”. The correct way to do it is to series connect the individual “cells” and get a BMS that is capable of managing the total number of cells.

Like you, if I was running an AC system capable of 72v then I would supply it with 72v as the current demand at that voltage would be lower.

Cheers
Pat.
 

Alex D

New Member
Hi Alex D,

My comment was directed to Cart_Performance, not you. Cart_Performance implied that as the AC system is 48v it would need 4 batteries. Without further clarification, to me this implies 4 series connected 12v batteries. You should never series connected Lithium “batteries”. The correct way to do it is to series connect the individual “cells” and get a BMS that is capable of managing the total number of cells.

Like you, if I was running an AC system capable of 72v then I would supply it with 72v as the current demand at that voltage would be lower.

Cheers
Pat.
Oops. Sorry!
 
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