Crimp vs Solder Shrink Butt Connectors

Screener

New Member
I have seen a lot of info on the newer solder connectors that include the build in shrink tube insultation. It appears that all you need to do is insert the bare wire ends into the connector then heat with a lighter. Anyone have any experience with these compared to the crimp type?
 

Notsoslim

Active Member
I have used them on my cart. They work fine. I like to go one size larger than necessary and add another sleeve of heat shrink tubing. By going one size bigger you slide the connector and shrink tube onto one side of the splice and then twist the stripped ends together. Then slide the solder connector over the bare portion on the wire and hit it with the heat gun until the solder flows over the splice. I then slide the 2" long shrink tube over the connector and hit it with the heat gun. I recommend using a heat gun and not a lighter. It is best to make some practice splices and give them the pull test to make sure you have a good strong splice.
 

Screener

New Member
Thank you for the reply. The adverts say these have shrink tubing built in. To make a good connection like you suggest I might as well you the old style crimp connectors.
Thanks for you insight.
 

Notsoslim

Active Member
They do shrink. If you use the size listed on the box you don't have to use the other shrink. I use the next size up so my wires are overlapped and soldered together rather that butted and soldered. I like knowing I have a strong splice. My splices are waterproof and pull resistant. I have never had one fail. I can't say the same for the old crimp connectors with 2 dissimilar metals crimped together and exposed to moisture. Electrolysis is for batteries not wire harnesses. I am in a saltwater environment.
 

Golf Cart Wizard

Cartaholic - V.I.P.
They do shrink. If you use the size listed on the box you don't have to use the other shrink. I use the next size up so my wires are overlapped and soldered together rather that butted and soldered. I like knowing I have a strong splice. My splices are waterproof and pull resistant. I have never had one fail. I can't say the same for the old crimp connectors with 2 dissimilar metals crimped together and exposed to moisture. Electrolysis is for batteries not wire harnesses. I am in a saltwater environment.
I second that, the nylon insulated butt splices are absolute garbage that IMO should not even be sold. I’ve seen these new solder tubes and they do seem to work as advertised, certainly better than butt splices. My preferred method is to use a Parallel Splice, such as the panduit ps16-m that I order here: https://www.arrow.com/en/products/ps16-m/panduit?q=PS16-M# (note: the two numbers are the size, they carry different sizes for different wire gauges). These splices are literally just a metal tube, you slide each wire in so they overlap each other rather than butt up, so you actually have a solid wire to wire electrical connection as well as a friction bond to keep the connection from pulling apart. Then I put adhesive lined heat shrink, the glue in the tube melts and forms a watertight seal around the splice. This is the same method that low volume OEMs use in their harnesses, higher volumes they use sonic welds like club car so there is no terminal used at all, but even these are still in effect a fancy parallel splice. I will also add for as much as I’ve heard of sonic weld problems in the club car harnesses I don’t think I’ve ever actually encountered one. Maybe on the early DS models way back when there were failures when they were still figuring things out, but I’ve pulled apart plenty of failed harnesses and tried to rip apart the sonic welds, let me tell you those things are strong. Most harness problems I see are from battery acid damage or salt exposure.
 

Notsoslim

Active Member
I hadn't heard of these before but I have heard the manufacturer Panduit. They are or were a major supplier of the large zip ties used on flex duct in HVAC. As a matter of fact most HVAC guys I know referred to those big zip ties as panduits. Panduit apparently branded themselves well like Kleenex, Vise grip or Channellock. Nobody says hand me the slip joint pliers. Some of these guys fabbing ductwork would play a joke on people by sneaking under your truck and putting a "Panduit" cinched down on your drive shaft. It wouldn't do any damage but it would make a hell of a noise until you cut it off.
Thanks for the tip on another way to a make splice with good structure, continuity and moisture resistance. What type of spade connectors do you use when the need arises?
 

Golf Cart Wizard

Cartaholic - V.I.P.
I use the TE Ultra-Fast terminals. These are the exact ones used by Club Car and EZGO. The .250 is the “standard” size and the .187 is the smaller one used for battery meter, tow switch etc. Pay attention to the mating tab thickness on the latter, there are two and both sizes can be found on different parts.

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Notsoslim

Active Member
This is all very good info for anyone making cart repairs or modifications. Those nylon and zinc coated tin connectors won't last a month where I live. Are the different sizes color coded?
 
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